Tuesday, April 26, 2011

The Evil Easter Bunny

Kristina is getting quite the reputation around here for her reaction to people in character costumes.

She had never been agreeable to sitting with Santa, and at the time I simply dismissed it as the age, as there many an 18 month old who will scream bloody murder at the sight of the jolly old elf.

(Or so I keep telling myself.)

But then we went to Disneyland, and I started to get the inkling that my child's irrational fear of large costumed individuals and subsequent flipping shit hypertension  might be something more than I had previously thought.

And then her preschool put on a Halloween parade and had a couple of low level teachers dress up as Mickey and Minnie Mouse, and Kristina absolutely would not go into the same room as them.

And then Christmas came around again.

Every time we went to the mall she'd have a panic attack at the sight of Santa. Again. Even though I've never made her sit with him in her life and continue to reiterate that she doesn't have to go near him if she doesn't want to.

She freaked out during her dance class when the instructor said Santa Clause was going to come dance with them on stage during their holiday recital in a few weeks.

(Serious thanks to the powers that be that kept that one from happening so my child would actually go dance.)

And spent a great deal of time asking for Santa to NOT visit her, NOT come into the house, and NOT leave her presents.

So let me tell you, I was just thrilled when malls brought out the Easter Bunny this spring.

However, I'd been fairly successful in keeping her steered pretty well away from the giant rodent photo opt display, and she seemed to be doing alright with hearing about his existence at school and such.

(As I sure as hell wasn't going to be opening that Pandora's box anytime soon and try to tell her about more creatures visiting out house.)

And then we went to the Bunny Train day on the day before Easter at the Golden Train Museum.

We'd had a few rough moments with the trains that morning, and her being startled by whistles and the loud steam let off, but she seemed to be coping pretty well with everything once we got settled for our ride.

There were volunteers passing out candy, and she was having just a delightful conversation about candy filled holidays with the boy sitting across from her while enjoying going around the park on the choo-choo a few times.

And then, he appeared.

The Easter Bunny. Outside. Greeting the children waiting in line for the next train and giving them plastic pastel eggs presumably filled with candy and/or small toys.



And you know what? Kristina actually seemed excited about it! She was even talking about giving him a hug, which was totally causing some serious disbelief in yours truly (as I would have been seriously impressed if she just got within 10 feet of the critter without flipping out), and about what color egg she wanted.

Good stuff, I thought. So nice that she's getting over it all on her--

And then we got off the train.

And she started screaming and wouldn't walk back to the main building because he was between it and her. 

Ah well, maybe in another year.

Or like, twelve....

(And the adorable little pumpkin sitting oh so cutely with Easter Bunny would be the girls' cousin Aerik.)

3 comments:

  1. "Keep your distance fat rodent and we'll be just fine." I can totally read your child's mind. And I very much understand her fear of them, of course they didn't start creeping me out until I was older...

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  2. oooh... my friend mel's daughter was like that for years. but when they finally went to disneyworld when she was older, she didn't have a problem w/ the characters. so, your daughter's not alone!

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  3. Kristina is wise beyond her years, if you ask me.

    When we went to Disneyland my kids would have nothing to do w/ the characters. They weren't scared, they felt badly for the people in the costumes who had -- according to my eldest -- "the worst job in the whole entire world." I concur.

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